OLA Lay Mission Movement

 

Damian Byrne gives an account of a recent Lay Mission Movement meeting and what the group means to him.

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Pictured at the recent OLA LMM gathering in Dromantine were: Back row: Jennifer Grant, Madge Deeney, Damian Byrne; Middle row:  Philomena Barron, Joan Barron, Sr. Patricia Mc Menamin, Sr. Eithna Synnott; Front row: Aine Deeney, Susan Mc Ardle, Louise Cullen, Sr. Mary Taylor, Sheree O'Connor.

 

The OLA Lay Mission Movement met on Saturday 8th October at Dromantine for an annual gathering of some of its members from the Letterkenny and Rostrevor groups. This provides everybody the opportunity to share time together in prayer and reflection and to discuss issues that are important to both groups on this shared journey with the OLA. Fr. Eddie Deeney, SMA guided the group through the day. One of the members present was Damian Byrne. Here Damian shares some of his experiences as a member of the OLA Lay Mission Movement group in Rostrevor, Co. Down:


I have been involved with the OLA Lay Missionary Movement in Rostrevor for four years. We are a committed group that prays daily in our own lives for the Sisters of OLA and the communities in which they work. We meet regularly to learn about the work of the OLA and to explore our faith. Sometimes we have OLA Sisters come and talk to the group about their work, which is a wonderful way for us to learn about the different realities on the ground in each country. We have explored different forms of prayer as part of our mission, including lectio divina and the beautiful missionary rosary.

My time in the group has been faith enriching and spiritually rewarding. It led me to visit all three OLA missions in Bugisi, Mwanza and Mwamapalala in Tanzania. I did one month of voluntary work with the Salesians of Don Bosco Secondary school in Didia, which works in collaboration with the OLA in Bugisi. While I stayed with the OLA, I witnessed the wonderful work of the Sisters in their outreach work into local communities, their provision of medical services where there were none, the way in which they generate employment locally and empower many young girls and women by teaching them the skills with which they can make a living and provide for their families. Their presence there is hugely impressive and evidence of the Lord’s work.

As we develop as a group, we pray to the Lord for guidance as we seek to deepen and develop our commitment to the OLA missions. I would encourage anybody to consider becoming involved in the OLA Lay Missionary Movement. It is a journey well worth making and you will be warmly welcome.

 

Click here for more information on the LMM Groups.